It’s always a good feeling when you walk into the office, pop open your email or ATS, and see that applications rolled in overnight. You feel ready to tackle the day knowing you’ll make some placements. But, how did you get to this point?  

Applicants first have to apply to your jobs – duh. Job descriptions should be enticing, honest and to the point. Follow these job description writing tips. 

Be Specific With Your Job Titles 

It’s important to include what the job title is, compared to what industry they’ll be working in. A lot of times we see jobs titled “Clerical” or “Light Industrial,” but you need to be more direct. There a million jobs within each industry, let your applicants know which one could be theirs.  

Let Them Know What They’ll Be Doing 

This seems like a no-brainer, but you’d be surprised how many job listings leave candidates scratching their heads. Candidates want to know what they’ll be doing day to day and who they’ll be doing it with. Include enough information in your job description that will paint a picture for the applicant.  

It’s All About the Money, Honey 

In a way, yes – it is. Like anyone, candidates can be money hungry. In some industries, a mere 15 cents can make the difference between applying and not. But, if they don’t know the salary to begin with, how can they make that decision? Adding a salary to your job descriptions can increase views and applications by 600%! It’s true – check out our case study. This is a simple, free way to get more eyes on your jobs! 

Show Them the Benefits 

Doesn’t everyone want a good set of benefits when they start a job? Everything from a healthcare plan and 401(k) to getting your birthday off should be represented in your job listings.  

What if They Have Questions? 

Delegate an email address or phone number to each job listing. Oftentimes, candidates will have questions about the job listing. To keep them from jumping to another site, give them a direct point of contact at your company. 

Job Descriptions Are an Art 

Writing great job descriptions comes from a lot of trial and error. When reviewing your job descriptions, put yourself in the candidates’ shoes and ask yourself – do I understand the job? Do I know what I’ll be doing? Would I apply to this job? 

If you need further help, connect with one of Haley Marketing’s marketing consultants today for more information.  

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