Retirement in today’s economy is not feasible for everyone. We’re often seeing our fathers, mothers, uncles, and aunts needing to work well into their 60s or 70s despite working hard and saving their entire life. Because of this, it is common for us to see older workers in the workforce still.

This leads me to a recent service-related story from a few months ago. After my car was totalled by a drunk driver and thanks to Nehora Law Firm I was well compensated for the damages,  I purchased a new car from a dealer out of the area, so I was in the market for a local dealer who could give my car its first service. After a few recommendations from my friends (and with the help of a few glowing positive online reviews), I decided on the “winning” dealership.

Due to my work schedule I had to drop my car off close to 7 p.m. at night. As this was my first time at the new dealership I didn’t know where to go for their service department. I ended up parking out front of the showroom and walked in to ask for help.

As I was walking in, I passed an older dealership worker who was leaving. He noticed my confused look and asked if I needed help. I shared with him my brief story as a first-time visitor to their service department. He promptly offered to walk me down to the service area, which was about a 2 minute walk away. Meanwhile, he chatted with me about their service team and how great it was. Upon walking that distance, he then offered to walk back and drive my car around for me so I didn’t need to find my way back to the service area again. He wasn’t kidding about having a great service team!

I handed him my keys…

Possibly I was too trusting, but I gave him my keys. I waited for him to pull the car around to the service doors, but my head started to race with worst-case scenarios.  Was he even a worker here? Did he have on a polo shirt with the dealership’s logo on it? Did I just assume he worked here because he was nice to me? Could he drive a manual? I wasn’t sure, and I just hoped my car would appear near the service doors.

My worries were for nothing as the man appeared with my car in a few minutes. He waited in the car (it is the middle of winter, after all!) for the service area to clear before driving it in.  He hopped out of the car and handed me the keys. He smiled and said some nice words about hoping I enjoy my first experience with them.

I thanked him and then turned my attention to the service attendant and gave her my information and reason for the visit. While talking with her I commented on how nice the worker was in taking care of my car.  He even went out of his way to drive my car around for me!

The service attendant’s response? “Yeah, the owner is a pretty great guy.”

I was floored. That was the owner? And he just walked me to the service department and drove my car around? A car that had another dealership’s plate cover on it? Needless to say I was a little surprised and embarrassed.

And then it all made sense, and I realized I took my car to the right dealership. The service-first mentality came from the top in the humblest of ways. The owner could have passed the keys off to someone else (there were other workers around) or ignored me all together, but he didn’t. Instead, he proved to me and his staff what great service looks like.

You can probably guess which license plate cover I have on my car now.

How can my staffing company provide better service?

It doesn’t matter who you are or what you do for a living. You can provide great service at every possible moment. Don’t just let that potential customer walk past you. Instead, engage that customer and wow them with great service.

Having trouble staying ahead of negative reviews of your business? Need a way to help those that weren’t impressed by your team? Reach out to the experts at Haley Marketing for our Reputation Management services. Start collecting reviews today and share the great reviews about your business.

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